Thursday, November 19, 2015

Tutorial - Mitered and Flanged Machine Binding

Today I'm excited to share a Mitered & Flanged Machine Binding Tutorial.
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It's fun, saves time and looks awesome!!
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Don't be overwhelmed by the number of steps -- after you do it once or twice it will become old hat... I know you'll love it.
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It works nicely for samples, baby blankets, and quilts that will be washed and worn!!
(or if you're in a plain old hurry ;)
It's the whopper of machine binding tutorials because I decided to include steps for a Mitered Finish as inspired by a YouTube video by Lisa Bongean (Primitive Gatherings) with Kimberly at The Fat Quarter Shop.
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I followed Lisa's steps to prepare the mitered finish -- AND included a link to their (most helpful) video in this tutorial.  After watching the video be sure to leave a comment or give it a "thumbs up" -- it's an awesome learning tool!

** Note, the YouTube video does not include instructions for the Flange OR the Machine Finish - it explains nicely though, how to prepare mitered corners and a mitered finish -- it's a great tool and video and helped me tremendously with the mitered finish.  Thanks so much ladies !!

OK - Let's get started:


We're going to make this sweet little flanged binding by machine with mitered corners, a mitered finish and with beautiful top-stitching to show off your pretty Aurifil threads!
 
Begin by choosing a primary and an accent (flange) fabric.
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Add in a complementary 50Wt thread for piecing and a 12Wt thread for top stitching.
I chose from my #AuriStash -- #Aurifil thread is always my first choice {love}. 

Determine Length of Binding Needed:

Calculate the total length of binding needed by adding the length of each of the 4 sides and adding an extra 10" to the number.
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The sampler was 18" square.  18 + 18 + 18 + 18 + 10. = 82 inches.
I assumed I could squeeze 41 usable inches per WOF strip, so I cut 2 strips of each the primary and the accent fabric.

Cut the Primary and Accent fabric strips:

 Cut the primary fabric 1&7/16" wide.
I did not have 16 of an inch marks on my ruler, so I split the width between 3/8 and 1/2 to achieve 7/16th of an inch.
Now cut the accent fabric 1&3/4" wide (by the number of strips you need). 
 Showing: Strips after cutting the correct number of Primary and Accent
 NOTE: When using solid colors, I sometimes place a pin in the right side of the fabric so I can tell the right side from the wrong side of the fabric.

Piece Binding Strips to Achieve Necessary Length:

 Now you want to prepare the total length of binding.  The sample required 82" so I pieced two WOF strips together at an angle (mitered seams).  
 Be sure that your diagonal line is marked correctly before sewing and cutting.
After testing the positioning of the fabric and diagonal line, stitch along the marked line with a straight stitch.  (Excuse my wonky straight line - it was Free Motion Stitched ;).
After stitching, remove the pins and check to ensure you have a continuous length before trimming.
 Now fold right sides together and trim the seam allowance to 1/4", trimming the tabs too and pressing open to reduce bulk. 
Repeat the above steps for the primary fabric.
  Now you've prepared the correct (total) length of each the primary and accent fabrics.

Sew Primary and Accent Fabrics Together Lengthwise & Press:


Next you'll layer the primary and accent strips right sides together, aligning one raw edge.
Sew along the edge with a 1/4" seam allowance
Showing the sewn raw edge
 Position binding on an ironing surface with the Primary fabric on top.
Press flat to set the seam
 Next open the fabric and press the seam toward the Primary fabric.
 Showing after binding is pressed open toward the Primary fabric
 Showing back after pressing toward the Primary Fabric
 Next you'll fold the wrong sides together, aligning the raw edges and gently press the length of binding.
I press gently so the fold IS NOT Crisp or Flattened.
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Attach prepared binding to Quilt Back:

This section of the tutorial was inspired by a YouTube tutorial prepared by Lisa Bongean (Primitive Gatherings) with Kimberly of the Fat Quarter Shop.
You can view that YouTube tutorial here:
"How to Add a Double Fold Binding to Quilts"
The section applicable to this tutorial starts around the 2:00 minute mark and continues to the 3:40 minute mark.
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Keep in mind Lisa is attaching to the front of her quilt and finishing by hand (on back) -- we will attach to the back of the quilt and finish with machine on the front.
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Continuing... attach binding quilt back:

Working on the BACK of the quilt, position the binding right side down with the Primary fabric to the right (aligning raw edge of Primary fabric with raw edge of quilt back).
Next fold the top right corner to the left, wrong sides together, to make a 45 degree angle and press.
 Now fold the binding wrong sides together so both of the binding raw edges are aligned with the raw edges of the quilt back.
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Position the binding about 1/2 way down the side of the quilt.
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You'll need space above the binding to complete the mitered finish.
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You will begin stitching the binding about 6" from the point shown below.
Leave at least 5" of the binding un-stitched (pin but don't stitch) and begin stitching with a 1/4" seam allowance.
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Stop a 1/4" from the quilt corner (I marked my 1/4" with a pin - see below).
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When you stop at the 1/4" mark, be sure your needle is in the down position.
 Showing, stop stitching 1/4" from the quilt corner.
 Now lift the presser foot and pivot the quilt layers so you can stitch off the edge of the quilt at a 45 degree angle.
 Showing: After stitching up to corner and with a 45 degree angle to the corner of the quilt
 Next, trim threads and rotate the quilt counter-clockwise and prepare for the mitered fold.
The fold (below) is required to make a mitered corner.
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After trimming threads and rotating the quilt so the stitched binding is running perpendicular to the foot, fold the binding strip straight up.
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When you do this you'll see a 45 degree angle from the corner of the quilt to the folded corner of the binding.
Keeping the top fold steady, lay the binding down over itself, so the 45 degree angle is preserved under the top layer and the straight fold is along the top edge of the quilt.
Begin stitching a 1/4" seam allowance at the top fold.
Stitch to within 1/4" of the next quilt corner and repeat the process.
Repeat the folding and stitching process at the next corner.
After you've mitered all 4 corners you'll be headed down the last side of the quilt (The side where you started the binding).
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  Stop stitching at least 6" (longer if you can) from the Beginning Tail of the quilt.
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You'll now have a beginning tail that is un-stitched and an end tail that is un-stitched.  
Remove quilt from the machine bed and trim threads.
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Lift the beginning tail up and fold it out of the way.
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Smooth the "End tail" down along the raw edge.
Be sure there are no puckers or folds and that it rests flat against the quilt.
Now unfold the "Beginning Tail" and position it over top of the "End Tail" -- making sure that both tails are smooth and are without puckers and are flat against the quilt back.
 Now you'll place a pin in the "End Tail" just a couple of threads away from the Point of the "Beginning Tail".
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Mark this position with a Pin through the top layer of fabric only (only through the accent fabric on the End Tail, do not pin the primary).
 Another image after putting a pin through the top layer only of the "End Tail" right at the point (pointed fold) of the "Beginning Tail".
Now, I use my left hand to unfold the End Tail.
Keep the right side of the fabric facing up
The Pin should remain on your right
and 
the primary fabric will unfold to the left. 
 Next you'll unfold the Beginning Tail so that the right side is facing DOWN
and
wrong side is facing you.
2nd image of the Beginning Tail unfolded with wrong side of fabric facing up.
The tricky part is positioning the Beginning Tail so it is perpendicular to the End Tail
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Align the Beginning Tail "Point" at the End Tail "Pin" and secure with pins
(Thanks Lisa!)
Here is where the crease from the fold comes into play -- you're going to stitch on the fold making the finished mitered seam.
(Be sure NOT to stitch through the quilt -- only stitch the binding)
After Stitching on the Fold
Before cutting excess fabric, fold the binding closed again (wrong sides together) and check to ensure that the binding is right sized and not twisted.
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This is a very important step -- do NOT Skip ;)
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Once you've double checked the length and positioning (no twists) of the binding you can trim the mitered finish to a 1/4" seam allowance.
Finger Press or Iron Press the seam open
Lay the binding along the raw edge and finish sewing it to the back of the quilt with a 1/4" seam allowance being sure to pickup a few stitches into where you stopped and started.
You're almost to the FUN PART!!!

Roll the Binding from Back to Front of Quilt & Prepare to Machine Stitch:

Yippee!!
Once you've finished securing the mitered finish on the back of the quilt, you get to 
roll the binding around to the front of the quilt and admire the beautiful flange...
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I just LOVE the look of the flange added to this binding...

Prepare the front of the quilt for machine stitching


Prepare each corner by tucking the bottom of the binding fabric into the corner and folding the top of the binding to make a 45 degree angle (or mitered corner).
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Secure with Wonder Clips (love those little clips).
After the tuck and fold you should see a perfectly mitered corner -- ready for stitching
Secure that corner with another Wonder Clip
Next...

Top stitch the Flange Binding

Use a 90/14 top stitch needle in your machine
Choose thread colors that complement your fabric.
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Both the Top and Bobbin thread
will be completely visible when you're done stitching. 
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Use Aurifil 50Wt or 40Wt thread in your Bobbin
Use Aurifil 12Wt thread on Top (my favorite)
Set a straight stitch length to 3.0 or higher (a nice "top stitch" length).
You may have to adjust your top tension down a bit (try it on a test swatch first).
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Start stitching near a corner, taking smaller stitches to secure the start.
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Note:  No need to stitch in the ditch.
Show off that awesome Aurifil 12Wt thread by stitching well on the flange
You may have to fuss when you get into a corner so there is a stitch just before the miter and one just after you turn the quilt top
Slowly stitch all the way around the quilt top to secure the binding and finish with smaller stitches to secure your threads.
Doesn't it look just beautiful ?
Here is an image of the front (left) and the back (right)...
Love, love, love!
I hope you found this tutorial helpful.
Thanks again to Lisa Bongean (Primitive Gatherings) and Kimberly from the Fat Quarter Shop for sharing the steps for the mitered finish. 
See links above.  
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This binding and the awesome Auriful thread adds great dimension to a quilt top and is admired by all who see it! 
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I especially love it because I can do the work by machine and save a little time preparing samples. 

  It's also great if your gifting the quilt to a little person, where a hand-sewn binding might not hold up under wear and tear and tugs... 
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Thanks for stopping by today -- leave me a comment and let me know what you think
Also -- I would love if you share this tutorial on social media AND if you send me pictures of any work you create with it.
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Be sure to follow me on social media (below) for fun and inspiring posts!.
See My Tutorials (tab on top of blog) for more detailed and free tutorials and patterns.

Is your Shop, Group or Guild preparing for their 2016/2017 Programs?  
I'm touring the countryside to share my love of quilting.
Email me for a list of available workshops.
(Oh Yeah -- Retirement from my Day Job is getting closer) 

You can write me anytime:  karen@redbirdquiltco.com or 
redbirdquiltco@gmail.com

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**
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I'm also on Pinterest and Twitter 
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Thanks for stopping by today...

~ Blessings ~
Karen

Note: This post may contain Affiliate Links.
If you purchase anything through these links I may be compensated for the purchase.
I promise to only recommend those products I know and love -- especially those with fantastic prices! 

79 comments:

  1. I just *love* the look of this binding with the 12 weight Aurifil! Thanks for a great tutorial, Karen.

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  2. Very detailed, very fabulous! I have made two lots binding like this for two quilts (yet to be quilted, so yet to have the binding attached!) following Missouri Quilt Company Youtube videos. Looking forward to getting my two quilted and the fancy pants flange bindings attached! BTW......love your use of the 12wt Aurifil for the top stitch, looks awesome!

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  3. so clearly explained and so effective. I would however sew to the right side and hand stitch the binding as I am sure not to get it straight your way!Will try it out on a small quilt

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  4. so clearly explained and so effective. I would however sew to the right side and hand stitch the binding as I am sure not to get it straight your way!Will try it out on a small quilt

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  5. Wow, Karen, that's quite the tutorial! You are always so thorough! I'll surely give this a try on my next small quilty project. With your keen instructions and great photos, I'm sure even I can do it! XO

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  6. Very long post, very detailed tutorial, VERY many thanks to you for sharing how to do this binding. THANK YOU. You are going to love being retired!! It's LIBERATING!!
    Happy Thanksgiving.
    xx, Carol

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  7. An excellent tutorial for this technique! Great detail and photos.....thank you. You even covered the problem spots--corners--really well.
    Ah, retirement....no resting, you will be busy!

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  8. Great tutorial. I will use it on my next quilt.

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  9. I love binding quilts like this! I did a large one for my granddaughter several years ago and it was really fast and sturdy.

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  10. Great tutorial, I am linking back to you on my Machine Binding post I just put up on Wednesday.

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  11. LOVED your tutorial, Karen!! I have two baby quilts that I have been thinking of sewing the binding on so this tutorial came at the PERFECT time!! Thank YOU!
    P
    PS Love the flange too!!

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  12. Excellent tutorial, can't wait to try it!!!

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  13. Wonderful tutorial Karen!! Well done. You are a great asset to our quilting world!! <3

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  14. Awesome, thorough tutorial! Thank you so much!

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  15. I've saved this to my Pinterest quilting info board! This would be an awesome way to bind Project Linus quilts! Sturdy, but with some extra flair. Thanks for this great tutorial. I really appreciate how you cover *all* the steps. No guesswork or pondering needed, which I appreciate.

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  16. I've saved this to my Pinterest quilting info board! This would be an awesome way to bind Project Linus quilts! Sturdy, but with some extra flair. Thanks for this great tutorial. I really appreciate how you cover *all* the steps. No guesswork or pondering needed, which I appreciate.

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  17. Golly, talk about step by step - fantastic!! I'll be keen to try this now!! I'll be pinning this too, thanks for all the work putting this tutorial together. :-)

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    Replies
    1. I gave this a try to day and it worked beautifully - thank you!

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  18. Thanks for the tutorial, great job explaining the steps and breaking everything down. I love the look and am going to try it!

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  19. Thanks for such an in depth tutorial. This must have taken you ages to prepare.

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  20. Your tutorial is excellent. . Thanks for sharing. You do the joining of the binding the same way I learned. I love this technique for doing bindings, although I have had a hard time getting friends to understand this method. Your tutorial is great though.Very clear and well done.

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  21. You went to a TON of work to create this thorough tutorial! Well done! Though you attach binding differently than I prefer to do, I appreciate the information about how to make the binding look flanged. It's a great concept. As I commented on IG, you might even get me to try machine sewing binding down! Thanks for your guidance.

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  22. Fantastic tutorial Karen! I haven't done a flanged binding in some time but I love the look and now I want to try it with 12 W thread and l always, always do binding by machine. Thanks Karen!

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  23. Thank you Karen for this excellent tutorial...so thorough and detailed!! I appreciate the time and hard work it took. I love the look of the flanged binding! Until now I didn't want to try machine sewn binding because I thought the stitching didn't look neat. I also really like the way you joined the beginning and ending. I can't wait to try this method!! :)

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  24. Hi Karen, I enjoyed your tutorial very much, in fact I used it for my circle quilt I just finished last night. Mine is hand stitched because I changed colours and had to match up with colour changes on the quilt. I thought it was too risky to try and machine stitch on my first attempt. I posted pictures on my blog and mentioned your blog in the post.

    I'll definitely try doing the mitred version and machine stitched version next time.

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  25. This is just beautiful Karen. I really love the look of it. It really gives a nice finish! Now I need to finish something so I can give it a try! Thank you for sharing and linking up! You rock girl! xo jan

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  26. My favorite part of flanged binding is adding another pop of color to help frame the quilt. Your tutorial looks great!

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  27. Great tutorial! I think I'll give it a try.

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  28. NEAT! THANK YOU FOR SHARING!
    msstitcher1214@gmail.com

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  29. Cant wait to try this, thank you

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  30. Karen, thank you very much for the lesson! I made good use of, can be found here

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  31. Very nice and very thorough. I have done these steps separately, but not together. Will try it on my very next binding!!

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  32. This is a great tutorial!! Thank you so much!
    Karen Mitchell

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  33. Fabulous tutorial. I plan to try on a quilt soon.

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  34. Exactly how I do my bindings... but yours looks a whole lot neater than mine...thanks for the GREAT tutorial!

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  35. So beautiful! Thank you for also sharing Lisa's double binding tutorial along with your flange binding with all of us! I really like the idea of using the 12 wt thread on top. Kudos!!!

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  36. A great tutorial for this binding method! Have taught to ladies at my guild a few times, but many are lost when they try to do it on their own. I would like to post your tutorial on our guild website with your permission .

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    Replies
    1. Cherri -- absolutely - go for it! Share away. Where is your Guild located ? Good luck to all.

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  37. Great tutorial, going to try it right now.

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  38. Great tutorial.....off to buy aurafil!!

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  39. I have been attempting to do mitred corners but you have made it look so much easier just by tweeking a few things. Many thanks i look forward to trying this instead of my usual big sigh and thinking oh no now to bind what a chore. A great tutorial along with great hilastration. Weldone!������

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  40. I really like this technique! I have done something that looks similar in the end, but I really like the method you use.

    coloured pvc binding covers

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  41. Thanks for giving permission to use this on the Chambersburg Quilt Guild, PA website.

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  42. This is really a super tutorial and the pictures are great!! Thanks a lot for sharing.
    Alessandra

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  43. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  44. Wow! Can't wait to try this, my grandsons quilt is nearly finished thank you

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  45. Great tutorial. I always fight joining my binding at end. Will try to "get it right" this time. So glad I found you on Pinterest. Have seen the double binding. Want to try it also. Thanks!

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  46. Awesome tutorial! I will pass your info on to my guild's program people, GardenStateQuilters.com

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    Replies
    1. Ginger -- thank you so very much. I would love to visit! I look forward to hearing from the Guild.

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  47. Awesome tutorial! I will pass your info on to my guild's program people, GardenStateQuilters.com

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    Replies
    1. Ginger -- thank you!! It would be great fun to visit your Guild -- we always have fun --oh, and we learn bunches too ;) I look forward to hearing from them.

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  48. Thank you for sharing two color binding. Am new to quilting. Like the finished look of this.

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  49. Love the tutorial, you make this technique look do-able, I must try this.

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  50. great tutorial! Love that technique and the extra little pop of color in the binding.

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  51. Thanks for the great pics and clear descriptions. Learned SO MUCH!!! Beautiful. Inspiring.

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  52. Can't wait to try this tomorrow, excellent tutorial and will post pic of completed project when done...hoping tomorrow.

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  54. I am just on my way to my crafty space to give this a go!
    I am doing it on a table runner to enter in our local country fair!
    Wish me luck!

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  57. I just discovered your site. This is a wonderful tutorial . I will definitely recommend this to my quilting friends. Thank you

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  60. OMG! no words! just I love you for share this!

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  61. Just finished binding a queen size quilt for my granddaughter's wedding present using this method. I love it! I am all for anything I can do with my machine as opposed to hand sewing. Thanks so much for sharing - it really saved me some time.

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  62. Thank you so much!!!! Made the perfect finish to my step-daughters baby quilt!

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  63. The contrast will give my table runner and placemats that something extra that was missing. Can't wait to try it. A Christmas gift for my sister in law. Don't have much experience quilting so the clear instructions and photos are most welcome. Thank you!

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  64. Great tutorial! I've been using this method for a couple years now and love it. I hate hand stitching binding and this gives a really professional look while machine sewing. I prefer to cut my fabrics 1.5" and 1.25".

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  65. I've been curious about this finish, but hadn't taken the time to hunt down the details. Thanks to Facebook, I found this tutorial and can't wait to try it! Thank you!

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  66. This is the absolute best tutorial! Your written description combines with crisp, clear photos show an amateur how to accomplish an advanced quilting task. Very nice and thank you!

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    Replies
    1. This such a wonderful idea I've never seen before. I can't wait to share it with my friend. She has neuropathy in her hands and can't sew by hand she is just going to love this, The tutorial is so well done it is so easy to follow. We will post some pictures after we try it. May you have a blessed Christmas. I know you'll will be busy in your retirement have fun.

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  67. Really this product seams to great and less price
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  68. A teacher after my own heart. Anticipating ahead, what the learner needs to know. Thank you. Also thank you for allowing us to machine sew binding for the "little folks".

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  69. Just came over from Em's Scrapbag. Love your tut for this binding. I've done a flanged binding before but your instructions and photos are excellent. This will be my go-to tut from now on. Thank you.

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